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Top 20 Most Deadliest Sports in the World

There are many Most Deadliest Sports in the World. While sports can be a great source of entertainment for everyone involved, from the players to the fans, injuries and even death may occasionally occur. Because sports involve a lot of physical contact, it comes as no surprise that they are dangerous. Which of these do you consider to be the most dangerous? From extreme sports like Base jumping to well-known ones like football, here are 20 of the Most Deadliest Sports in the World.

1. Base Jumping

Don’t think jumping out of an airplane with 15,000 feet to go is dangerous. Many people find this not challenging enough, so they opt for cliffs and man-made objects like towers. In reality, jumping from such heights is more challenging due to the lack of time available to deploy the parachute or deal with any problems. The acronym BASE describes the type of objects people jump off. This acronym stands for Buildings, Antennas (tower), Spans (or bridges), and Earth (natural formations such as cliffs, canyons, and gorges). Carl Boenish developed it in 1978. Since then, it has gained popularity.

2. Horse riding

Have you ever dreamed of owning your own pony and riding it every day? Most of us have heard of horseback riding, but did you know that it is among the world’s deadliest sports? Every year, horse riding accidents result in fatal injuries and even deaths. Tramples while on the ground near the horse are the most common cause of injury. It wouldn’t take long for someone to make you a permanent fixture with your powerful hooves in the hospital. Another cause can be being thrown from your horse or being kicked while leading the horse into a paddock. If you do get that pony you dreamed of, please remember to exercise extreme caution?

3. Scuba diving

Underwater sports like scuba diving are rapidly gaining popularity around the world. SCUBA – Self-Contained Underwater Breathing Apparatus – is used to stay underwater long enough to savor the beauty of marine life. Some divers are attracted to scuba diving because of the underwater life, but others are drawn to it because of the thrill of exploring wrecks or caves. In this sport, the main danger lies in the sudden changes in pressure. These changes in pressure can potentially rupture a lung, damage an eardrum or damage the sinuses. High-pressure gas exposure can cause nitrogen and helium to accumulate in the bloodstream, potentially causing tissue damage or even blood vessel blockage or even blood supply shut off! The failure of diving equipment could also lead to casualties.

4. Running of the bulls

On the 6th of July in Pamplona, Spain, takes place the festival of San Fermin, or running of the bulls as it is more commonly known. Originally it was used to transport bulls from the breeding grounds to the bull ring, where they were slaughtered. Kids would jump in beside these bulls to show off their bravado. Over the years, it has evolved into a festival with music, dancing, and markets. After the first two rockets, the run ends with the third and fourth rockets signaling that the bulls have entered the bull-ring. Running with bulls is extremely dangerous. In addition to getting injured by goring and asphyxiation, people often become suffocated by crowding and might be crushed by bulls.

5. Jallikattu

Bull-taming, also known as Jallikattu, occurs on a different continent and has different rules than bull-taming. It is a sport that is played in Tamil Nadu during the Pongal (thanksgiving for abundant harvests) festival in which only one person wins – a man or a bull. This type of sport requires someone to hold onto a bull for a specified period of time or distance in order to win, while a variant involves releasing the bull into an open field with participants trying to subdue it. In the last two decades, as many as 200 people have died playing this sport due to its dangers. Additionally, the sport has been banned as a result of protests by animal activists against the cruelty meted out to the animals.

6. Bull riding

Rodeo sport in which a rider tries to stay mounted on a bull as long as possible while the bull tries to get him off. Our jitters are heightened by the mere mention of mounting a 1000kg bull, so I guess it doesn’t need to be explained much about the risks involved in the sport itself. In addition to injuries to the head, neck, and face, concussions are among the most common injuries in this sport. Following the pox that resulted in the death of cowboy Lane Frost, protective vests made of ballistic material were made compulsory after a bull gored him and punctured his heart. Although this and other protective measures have reduced accidents in the sport, it remains the “most dangerous 8 seconds in sports”.

7. Gymnastics

Gymnastics tests your balance, strength, flexibility, and control. Although originally designed to prepare soldiers for war in the military, it is now an Olympic sport contested by a vast number of athletes. Though it is associated with graceful women and men in leotards, this sport has an ugly side to it as well. The risks are no doubt what I’m referring to. Some of the injuries include wrist fractures, spinal fractures, ankle sprains, and cartilage damage. One of the worst gymnastics accidents in history happened to Julissa Gomez. During a warm-up in May 1988 she slipped and slammed her head, giving her a paralysis from the neck down that lasted until 1991 when she died.

8. Boxing: Most Deadliest Sports in the World

Punching is a contact sport in which the participant’s sole goal is to punch his opponent. Injuries are inevitable in sports like this. In the course of their careers, 90% of boxers suffer brain damage. Some of them may even develop diseases like Parkinson’s or Alzheimer’s later in life. Isn’t that frightening? However, injuries can be minimized if the proper protective equipment is worn.

9. Soccer: Most Deadliest Sports in the World

It is likely that soccer is ranked second on this list because of its high injury rate. This could simply be due to the large number of players playing football. It deserves mention, however, due to the frightening statistics that surround injuries and deaths in this sport. According to statistics, there is a 75% chance of getting a concussion in this game compared to 5% in other games. As a footballer, you are always aware of the risks to your body and brain. However, the sheer love for the sport and huge fan following keeps the fire burning.

10. Cycling

Due to the high number of casualties associated with bicycling, it is ranked first on this list. Some might immediately attribute the injuries to extreme mountain biking. In reality, other vehicles cause more injuries than any other reason. The film Premium Rush vividly documents this. There is a risk involved in every second of the film, so you will be on the edge of your seat. Bicycling on the streets could prove to be extremely dangerous. It may also serve as a gateway to the hospital.

11. American Football

Football can be a dangerous sport, which may seem hard to believe. Most of us nowadays don’t even see it as a danger, even though American football has killed so many people.

With early games leaving dozens dead on the field, football was even more dangerous than now. Most deaths and life-changing injuries occurred when a head-to-head collision occurred, as the protective gear was primitive compared to what is available today. However, the fact remains that broken bones, neck and head injuries, and various types of concussions are the norm in football.

12. Free Diving

Because of its many perils, scuba diving is considered more dangerous than many other sports, but a few others are even more hazardous. One of them is free diving.

Scuba diving uses breathing equipment and gas to dive deep without using any. By diving with no gear, often deep down ocean holes, in an unnatural environment for humans, freediving is sure to be beautiful and pure. But it will undoubtedly take a toll on a person. From 2006 to 2011, freediving accidents totalled 417, 308 of them fatal.

13. Cheerleading

Many jokes about cheerleaders question the athleticism of their participants. 

Be aware of their cheerful attitude and smiles, though.

Most catastrophic injuries in girls’ high school athletics occur during cheerleading events. 

It is not uncommon for cheerleaders to be thrown 30 feet. Unless their teammate can catch them, they won’t have any protective gear to protect them from falling. 

Some cheerleaders perform stunts on padded mats, but statistically, more high school cheerleaders suffer head injuries than football players. Cheerleaders might hurt their legs and sprain their ankles while performing all the stunts.  

14. White Water Rafting

We are taking the adrenaline junkies to white water rafting on our list. If we add the peril of smashing into rocks or getting stuck under the boat, or even getting stuck under rocks, riding an inflatable boat on a river may not seem dangerous at first. Drowning and broken bones are the most common outcomes of white water rafting accidents.

15. Big Wave Surfing

Natural predators and craggy rocks abound in the ocean, making it already a dangerous place.

However, for many surfers, the siren song of the ocean draws them to the water every day.

In addition, there are those surfers who can’t be satisfied with the typical wave’s adrenaline rush. They dream of waves we would all dream of if we were them in their dreams.

Generally speaking, big wave surfing isn’t too dangerous. There have only been four deaths from big waves over the past decade. Even though those are still significant numbers (and no less tragic), they don’t sound as ominous as the other sports.

It’s still possible to be knocked unconscious if you fall off your board after riding a big wave. It usually takes you fewer than 20 seconds to return to the surface, even if you remain conscious. 

There is no doubt that this sport is not for the weak-hearted.

16. Bo-Taoshi: Most Deadliest Sports in the World

The Japanese name for Bo-Taoshi translates as “pole toppling” or “pole bringing down.” Capture the Flag is a lot less dangerous than Bo-Taoshi. 

Some believe the Japanese militia first developed the sport in 1945 to prepare soldiers for battle. Accordingly, this game is played during the induction ceremony. Japanese kids and teenagers even play it during special sports days and holidays.  

There are usually 300 players in a typical match. 

That’s right: 300. 

There are 150 insane players versus another 150 equally insane players. 

To form offensive and defensive units, each team splits into two halves. The defensive team wears white, and the offensive team wears a bright colour. 

At the firing of a gun, the defensive players position themselves around a pole (between 10-16ft high), and at the gun’s firing, the attacking team throws themselves (quite literally) at the other team to knock down the pole.

17. Auto Racing

Thousands of kilograms of metal wrapped around you at 150 miles per hour on hard asphalt, and the chance of losing your life in a crash of one in 100, car racing is undoubtedly one of the most Deadliest Sports in the World.

The suit and helmet technology have evolved to increase the safety of race cars and drivers, but technology also works the other way around. There are more accidents and faster cars today. The number of fatalities on race circuits worldwide has exceeded 40 since 2001.

18. Heli-Skiing: Most Deadliest Sports in the World

When a ski resort is no longer enough, what do you do? Oh well, you pay a helicopter pilot to get you up some of the most frightening, snow-capped mountains on earth, and at the same time, you try to remain intact until the very end.

Winter adrenaline junkies probably love heli-skiing the most out of any extreme sports. Even though many people are afraid to fly, especially in a helicopter, that is the safest part of this sport – and the least fun. The best part is skiing downhill. You don’t have to freeze to death far away from civilization, get swept by an avalanche, or plunge off a cliff to die between then and then.

19. Wingsuit Flying

Considering how new this sport is, most people haven’t heard of wingsuit flying. However, it has evolved a lot since its launch in the mid-1990s. Flying in a wingsuit is an extreme sport in which pilots wear a jumpsuit that gives them extra lift and the ability to glide through the air horizontally after jumping from a plane or cliff. This allows for a longer and further flight than a normal skydive due to the reduced rate of descent.

Thus, skydivers and BASE jumpers worldwide adopted it for this reason. With records set on distance, flying in formation, and flying as close to mountains and trees as possible, wingsuiters are pushing the limits of what a human can accomplish. The sport can take its toll sometimes if these audacious undertakings fall apart.

20. Street Luging

Street luging involves riding down specially paved surfaces while lying on a ” sledge ” board.

When skateboarders searched for faster ways to travel on their boards, they discovered that lying on their boards instead of standing would propel them much faster.

Ranking sports based on the dangers involved isn’t exactly that easy. Many sports haven’t made this list but that doesn’t necessarily make them any less dangerous. But one thing that can be remembered is that being prepared. Taking the necessary protective measures could go a long way, possibly even save your lives!

Also Read: The 10 most deadliest viruses in the world in history

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